Site Loader
81 Great Western Hwy, Colyton NSW 2760

About Us

About

Located in the greater west of Sydney, Colyton Veterinary Hospital is a purpose-built facility that is equipped to cater for both simple and complex cases. As one of few veterinary hospitals in Sydney to be equipped with a CT Scanner,

What is desexing?

Desexing or neutering your pet is a surgical procedure that prevents an animal from being able to reproduce.

This is the most frequent surgery performed by our team, and your pet is generally home by the evening of surgery. Refer to the anaesthesia page for more information about the anaesthetic for your pet.

The ideal age to desex your pet is at 6 months of age, before they start to reproduce, though pets are desexed at any age. 

We are one of the few veterinary hospitals in Sydney that offers laparoscopic desexing to our clients as an alternative to traditional desexing.

Laparoscopic desexing is performed with the use of an endoscopic camera and an instrument port to remove the ovaries and uterus in a minimally invasive way. We have also used this technique to remove undescended testicles that remain within the abdomen.

Why desexing your pet is important

1. Prevention of unwanted litters, which can be very costly, and will only add to the already overwhelming number of stray animals that are euthanised every day.

2. Prevention of testicular cancer and prostate disease in males. It can also help prevent pyometra (infection of the uterus) and mammary tumours (breast cancer) in females.

3. Stop the “heat” cycle in females that prepares them for mating, which is the time that males will attempt to mate with her. We frequently see animals who have accidentally mated which could have been prevented by desexing the animals before their first heat cycle (aka season). There may be a potential surcharge to desex an animal that is on-heat or pregnant as the surgery is more complex.

4. Decrease aggression towards humans and other animals, especially in males.

5. Being less prone to wander, especially in males.

6. Living a longer and healthier life.

7. Reduction of council registration fees. 


Common questions about desexing
 

“Should my female have one litter first?”
No – it is actually better for her not to have any litters before being spayed. Her risk of developing breast cancer also increases if she is allowed to go through her first heat.


“Will desexing affect my pet’s personality?”

Your pet will retain their pre-operation personality, possibly with the added bonus of being calmer and less aggressive.

“Will it cause my pet to become fat?”
Your pet’s metabolism may be slowed due to hormonal changes after desexing, however, this is easily managed by adjusting feeding and ensuring adequate exercise. There is no reason a desexed pet cannot be maintained at a normal weight.

“Is desexing painful?”
As with all surgery, there is some tenderness immediately after the procedure, but most pets will recover very quickly. We administer pain relief prior to surgery and after surgery too. Your pet will be discharged with a short course of pain relief medication to take at home for the first few days after the surgery.  In many cases, your pet will likely need some encouragement to take it easy!
 

Desexing your pet

Before surgery:

  • Make a booking for your pet’s operation.
  • If required, wash your pet a few days before surgery as they are unable to be washed again until after the stitches are removed (10-14 days). We will wash your pet’s surgical area, though we do recommend that your pet is clean before undergoing surgery to minimise the chance of infection.
  • Do not give your pet food after 8pm the night before the operation and remove access to water after 7am on the day of surgery.
  • A blood test may be performed prior to surgery to check vital organ function. We recommend this to every patient. See the anaesthesia page for more information.
  • The vet will perform a thorough physical examination before administering an anaesthetic.
  • Some pets will require intravenous fluid support during surgery.
  • To ensure your pet is as comfortable as possible, all pets receive pain relief prior to desexing and some to take home for a few days after the procedure.

After Surgery:

  • Treat your pet as a human after a surgical procedure. Visit the anaesthesia page for more information.
  • Food and water should be limited to small portions only on the night after surgery. Give ¼ of the pets’ daily portion every 4 hours, with a normal portion size after 12 hours.
  • Follow any dietary instructions that the vet has provided.
  • Ensure all post-surgical medications (if any) are administered as per the label instructions. Please contact us if you are having trouble medicating your pet as we may be able to provide you with a different solution. 
  • Ensure your pet’s rest area is clean to avoid infection.
  • Check the incision at least twice daily for any signs of infection or disruption (eg. bleeding, swelling, redness or discharge). Contact the vet immediately if these symptoms appear. Do not wait to see if they will resolve as this could lead to severe infection instead.
  • Prevent your pet from licking or chewing the wound. Special cone-shaped collars assist with this problem. A single chew can remove the careful stitching with life-threatening effects if left untreated.
  • Ensure you return to us on time for routine post-operative check-ups and removal of stitches.
  • If your pet is too boisterous, we may provide you with medication to help to keep them calm. We can also provide a cage at the hospital for a short period after surgery whilst you set your home up to accommodate your recovering pet.

What is dental disease?

Dental disease begins with a build-up of bacteria in… your pet’s mouth. Bacteria, combined with saliva and food debris, can cause plaque to accumulate on the tooth.

As calcium salts are deposited, plaque turns to tartar (brown or yellow material starting near the gum line of the tooth).

Without proper preventive or therapeutic care, plaque and tartar build-up lead to periodontal disease, which affects the tissues and structures supporting the teeth.

Periodontal disease can cause oral pain, tooth loss, and even heart or kidney problems.

Common signs of dental disease, in order of severity, include: 

  • Yellow-brown tartar around the gumline
  • Inflamed, red gums
  • Bad breath
  • Change in eating or chewing habits (especially in cats)
  • Pawing at the face or mouth
  • Excessive drooling
  • Pain or bleeding when you touch the gums or mouth

If your pet is showing any of these signs of dental disease, please book an appointment to see one of our veterinarians. Early assessment and action can save your pet’s teeth.

How can you prevent dental disease in your dog or cat?

Long-term control and prevention of dental disease requires regular home care. The best way to begin this is to accustom your pet from an early age. Dental home care may include:

Brushing teeth daily – just like us! This is the best form of dental hygiene. Pet toothbrushes and toothpaste are now available. Please do not use human toothpaste on your pet as they are not designed to be swallowed and may be toxic.

Feed pets’ raw meaty bones or special dental diets as this can help to reduce the accumulation of tartar. Remove the bone once the meaty parts have been chewed off to prevent the pet splintering the bone and potentially cutting its throat (common injury). Ingested bones can also cause constipation.

Use dental toys, enzymatic chews, or teeth cleaning biscuits, all of which can help to keep the teeth clean.

What does a professional dental clean involve?

Regular and frequent attention to your pet’s teeth may avoid the need for a professional dental clean under anaesthetic and will also improve your pet’s overall health.

It is the same as a scale and polish done by a dentist for humans. However, unlike us, our pets won’t sit still or open their mouth to allow a comprehensive cleaning of their teeth.

For this reason, our pets need to have a general anaesthetic for a professional dental clean.

Firstly, your pet will be assessed by one of our veterinarians. The degree of dental disease will be assessed to determine if extractions, antibiotics and anti-inflammatories will be required.

The assessment may also include a physical exam, blood tests and urine tests to ensure they are healthy prior to having an anaesthetic.

We also recommend dental X-rays to assess if there is any damage to your pets teeth under their gums. We use a specialised X-ray unit that can X-ray each individual tooth and its roots within the jaw.

Once anaesthetised, we can give the teeth a thorough clean using our specialised dental equipment.

If your pet requires tooth extraction, we may provide him/her with a dental block using a local anaesthetic to reduce the feeling of the tooth being removed.

When your pet goes home we will also discuss methods of reducing dental disease in the future.

After the dental procedure

After the dental procedure, it is advised to monitor your pet’s behaviour to look for signs of pain or discomfort.

If there has been tooth extractions or infection, your pet may require medication.

If you have any difficulties giving the medication, please contact us as soon as possible as there may be an alternate form that we can give you.

If your pet has had an anaesthetic, please treat them like a human patient and let them rest to recover. See the anaesthesia page for more information.

Your pet may be able to walk, however they should not be encouraged to be active and should eat small meals frequently for the first 12 hours (approximately ¼ of the size of their normal daily portion every 4 hours). Always ensure plenty of water is available unless directed otherwise by your vet.

Here are two images that depict a dogs teeth before and after they have been professionally cleaned.

Vaccination has revolutionised control of infectious disease in our pets. It is essential that all pets are adequately vaccinated to help protect the pet population as a whole.

Responsible pet care requires kittens to be given their initial course of vaccinations, but this cannot protect them for the rest of their lives. Adult cats require regular vaccination to maintain immunity against disease.

Cat Vaccination

Kitten Vaccination
Kittens are ‘temporarily’ protected against many diseases by antibodies received through their mother’s milk. These maternal antibodies decline in the first couple of months of their lives, however, until they drop sufficiently they can also neutralise vaccines. This is why a series of vaccinations is necessary for a kitten.

Adult Cat Vaccination
The immunity from kitten vaccination weakens over time and your pet can again become susceptible to disease. Annual health checks and booster vaccinations will provide the best protection for the life of your pet.

A Guide to Cat Vaccination
Initial vaccination programs should provide three vaccinations 3-4 weeks apart against some or all of the following; feline panleukopenia, calicivirus, rhinotracheitis, chlamydia and leukaemia virus at or after 8 weeks of age. Three vaccinations, 2-4 weeks apart, against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are recommended at or after 8 weeks of age.

After Vaccination Care
Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Access to food and water and a comfortable area to rest are usually all that is required for a quick recovery. However, if the response seems more severe, you should contact us for advice.

What cats are vaccinated against:

Feline Enteritis (also known as Feline Panleucopenia) 
It is very contagious, and the death rate is high, especially under 12 months of age. Pregnant cats may lose their young or give birth to kittens with abnormalities, quite often with brain damage. Symptoms are depression, loss of appetite, uncontrollable vomiting and diarrhoea, often with blood and severe abdominal pain.

The virus spreads so easily that heavily contaminated areas may need cleaning with a special disinfectant. Cats that do recover may continue to carry the virus for some time and infect other cats.

Feline Respiratory Disease (Catflu)
Feline respiratory disease affects cats of all ages, especially young kittens, Siamese and Burmese cats. It is highly contagious and causes sneezing, coughing, runny eyes, nasal discharge, loss of appetite and tongue ulcers.

Fortunately, the death rate is low except in young kittens, but the disease is distressing and may persist for several weeks. Recovered cats can continue to carry and spread the infection for long periods, and can show signs of the disease again if they become stressed.

Chlamydia (also known as Chlamydophila)
Feline Chlamydia causes a severe persistent conjunctivitis in up to 30% of cats.

Kittens are more severely affected by Chlamydia when also infected with “Cat Flu”, and Chlamydia can be shed for many months. Vaccination against cat flu and Chlamydia helps protects against clinical disease.

Feline Leukaemia (FeLV)
Feline Leukaemia is a serious disease of cats caused by feline leukaemia virus.

The virus attacks the immune system and may be associated with lack of appetite, weight loss and apathy, pale or yellow mucous membranes, vomiting, diarrhoea, reproductive problems, increased susceptibility to other infections, leukaemia and tumours. Many cats may be infected and show no signs at all.

About one third of infected cats remain chronically infected and may shed virus in their saliva, tears, nasal secretions and urine. The disease is then spread to uninfected cats by mutual grooming, fighting, sneezing or even flea bites.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) 
Feline AIDS is a disease caused by infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and affects the cat’s immune system. Their natural defence against attack by other diseases may be seriously affected, much in the same way as human AIDS. This disease is not transmissible to humans.

FIV is almost always transmitted by bites from infected cats. The virus that causes the disease is present in saliva. While some infected cats show no sign of disease, others may display initial symptoms such as fever, loss of appetite, diarrhoea, lethargy and swollen lymph nodes.

As the disease progresses, symptoms may occur such as weight loss, sores in and around the mouth, eye lesions, poor coat and chronic infections.

Eventually, the immune system becomes too weak to fight off other infections and diseases. As a result, the cat may die from one of these subsequent infections. Unfortunately, in Australia a lot of cats are infected with this virus.

Dog Vaccination

Vaccination has revolutionised control of infectious disease in our pets. It is essential that all pets are adequately vaccinated to help protect the pet population as a whole. Responsible pet care requires puppies to be given their initial course of vaccinations, but this cannot protect them for the rest of their lives. Adult dogs require regular vaccination to maintain immunity against disease.

Puppy Vaccination
Puppies are ‘temporarily’ protected against many diseases by antibodies received through their mother’s milk. These maternal antibodies decline in the first few months of their lives, however until they drop sufficiently they can also neutralise vaccines. This is why a series of vaccinations is necessary in a puppy.

Adult Dog Vaccination
The immunity from puppy vaccination weakens over time and your pet can again become susceptible to disease. Annual health checks and booster vaccinations, as required, will provide the best protection for the life of your pet.

After Vaccination Care
Following vaccination your dog may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Access to food and water and a comfortable area to rest are usually all that is required for a quick recovery. However, if the response seems more severe, you should contact us for advice.

Canine Parvovirus
Canine parvovirus is a disease that affects dogs of all ages but is most serious in young pups and older dogs. The virus attacks the intestines causing blood-stained-diarrhoea, uncontrollable vomiting and severe abdominal pain. Dogs often die from severe dehydration despite intensive veterinary care.

It is not necessary to have direct contact with other dogs for the disease to be spread. The virus is so persistent that the infected dog’s environment needs to be cleaned with a potent disinfectant to prevent spread to other dogs (bleach, F10). Outbreaks occur regularly throughout Australia, especially in summer.

What dogs are vaccinated against:

Canine Distemper

Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral disease that can affect dogs of any age with young puppies being at highest risk.

Symptoms vary but can include fever, coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite and depression. Muscle tremors, fits and paralysis usually occur later in the disease. Treatment is usually ineffective and the recovery rate very low. Dogs that do recover may have permanent brain damage.

Canine Hepatitis
Canine hepatitis is a viral disease which, like distemper is extremely contagious and often fatal. Dogs of any age can become infected, however severe cases are rare in dogs over two years of age.

Symptoms include high fever, depression, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea and acute abdominal pain. In severe cases death can occur within 24 to 36 hours. Dogs that recover may develop long term liver and kidney problems and can act as carriers spreading the disease to other dogs for many months.

Canine Cough
Canine cough is a condition produced by several highly infectious diseases, which can be easily spread wherever dogs congregate, such as parks, shows, obedience schools and boarding kennels. Among the infectious agents associated with canine cough is the bacterium known as Bordetella bronchiseptica and the canine virus’s parainfluenza, adenovirus type 2 and distemper.

Affected dogs have a dry hacking cough which can persist for several weeks. It is distressing for pet dogs and their owners. It is a major problem for working and sporting dogs. Pneumonia can also be a consequence of infection.

Canine Coronavirus

Canine coronavirus is another contagious virus and causes depression, loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhoea especially in young dogs. Diarrhoea may last for several days in some cases. Although most dogs will recover with treatment, coronavirus has the potential to be fatal, especially if other infectious agents such as parvovirus are present.

Canine Leptospirosis
Canine leptospirosis is a serious disease risk in some areas and can cause high death rates. It is spread by the urine of rats and is usually transmitted to dogs by contaminated food and water, or by rat bites.

There’s an increased risk where high rat populations exist such as rubbish dumps or green sugar cane cutting areas. Incidence can also increase after long periods of wet weather, when rat populations are forced to move or concentrate. Leptospirosis is an animal disease that can be passed to humans who may then suffer a persisting “flu-like” illness.

Client Testimonials

Highlighted Posts

Contact us

81 Great Western Hwy, Colyton NSW 2760